Workshop details

  1. Home
  2. Workshops
  3. guidance for research on dental ceramics- fracture toughness- fatigue- bilayered structures- adhesion and fractography

guidance for research on dental ceramics- fracture toughness- fatigue- bilayered structures- adhesion and fractography

19th October2018 09:00 AM - 04:00 PM
Credit Hours 11 HALL al manial

prof. paulo cesar

biomaterials and oral biology

Introduction

This workshop was created based on an increasing need to provide mentorship to young faculty and graduate students doing dental materials research. It is often the case that proposed projects are not well conceived, ignore important literature or anticipate using inappropriate methodology. One important learning objective is related to generating broader discussions on methodology and techniques. The workshop will try to "translate" international Standards (ISO, ASTM, DIN, JIS, etc) which embody highly prescriptive “guidelines” often intended for use by technical staff rather than frontline scientific researchers. Their purpose is to determine compliance or non-compliance of products with agreed minimal performance levels. They may be of great use for research purposes, but often with appropriate modification.

While the ISO standard (“guidance”) for strength testing of ceramics recommends beveling the edges of bend bars and using fracture surface analysis to verify failure from the expected location, these standards do not inform as to the reason.  Moreover, modification may be necessary in specimen preparation from small CAD-CAM blocks.  Although this workshop was designed with young researchers in mind, it is also meant to help academic tutors, industry and dental materials researchers in general, with organized and systematic information on how to perform in vitro research of the highest quality possible.

Intended Learning Objectives

The workshop will try to "translate" international Standards (ISO, ASTM, DIN, JIS, etc) which embody highly prescriptive “guidelines” often intended for use by technical staff rather than frontline scientific researchers. Their purpose is to determine compliance or non-compliance of products with agreed minimal performance levels. They may be of great use for research purposes, but often with appropriate modification.

Although this workshop was designed with young researchers in mind, it is also meant to help academic tutors, industry and dental materials researchers in general, with organized and systematic information on how to perform in vitro research of the highest quality possible.